Intertextuality

 

intertextuality examples in literature

Intertextuality in Postmodern Literature. BACK; NEXT ; The poet John Donne once wrote that "no man is an island," and for postmodernists, no text is an island. Postmodernism is all about the connections between texts, including the various ways in which one text references another (or many others). Oct 15,  · Examples of intertextuality include Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein; or, the Modern Prometheus (which alludes to the Greek myth of Prometheus), James Joyce's novel Ulysses (which is . A famous example of intertextuality in literature is James Joyce’s Ulysses as a retelling of The Odyssey, set in Dublin. Ernest Hemingway used the language of the metaphysical poet John Donne in naming his novel For Whom the Bell Tolls.


Simple Examples of Intertextuality for a Better Understanding


Intertextuality pronounced in-terr-text-yoo-a-lih-tee is not a literary or rhetorical device, but rather a fact about literary texts — the fact that they are all intimately interconnected. This applies to all texts: novels, works of philosophy, newspaper articles, films, songs, intertextuality examples in literature, paintings, etc. Remember: every text again in the broadest sense is intertextual. Fan fiction is a great example of deliberate intertextuality. In fan fiction, authors enter the fictional worlds of other authors and create their own stories, intertextuality examples in literature.

For example, a Lord of the Rings fan fiction might tell the story of minor characters or add new characters to the world of Middle Earth. Sometimes, fan fiction becomes extremely successful in its own right — 50 Shades of Grey was originally written as Twilight intertextuality examples in literature fiction.

Much of this intertextuality was deliberate, intertextuality examples in literature, with King explicitly crediting Gandhi as one of his influences. When a heavy metal artist makes references intertextuality examples in literature Norse mythology, or when a novelist draws on the works of Shakespeare as inspiration, these choices forge a relationship between the old text and the new.

We can call this deliberate intertextuality. They all contribute to building your specific worldview which, in turn, determines intertextuality examples in literature you write or create art.

We can call this latent intertextuality. We might find a similarity between two texts, but we have no way to know whether it was deliberate or accidental unless the author tells us!

Intertextuality shows how much a culture can influence its authors, even as the authors in turn influence the culture. Even seemingly disparate fields, such as music and philosophy, can exert a strong influence on each other through intertextuality — the philosopher Nietzsche, for example, was heavily influenced by the early operas of Richard Wagner.

Similarly, authors from different cultures and historical periods can influence each other! Intertextuality also shows how a similar cultural, religious, political, or moral ideology can be expressed in very different ways through different cultural practices. For example, think about the way that art, music, literature, and philosophy all changed in the aftermath of World War I. This earth-shattering event made people feel like nothing was stable or certain, and intertextuality examples in literature was reflected in all aspects of artistic and scholarly pursuits.

Post-war paintings were far more abstract and chaotic; post-war philosophy was nearly obsessed with problems of evil and unpredictability; post-war music was more formless and atonal; post-war novels questioned the rules of linear structure and chronology.

Every aspect of the society was affected by the events of this bloody war, and everything produced in its aftermath shows plenty of latent and sometimes deliberate intertextuality, intertextuality examples in literature.

For Joyce, the point of this deliberate intertextuality intertextuality examples in literature to show that ordinary people can experience something heroic in their everyday lives. In the earlier film, he plays a heavy metal guitarist whose amplifier, as we learn in one scene, can be turned up to 11 instead of the usual Three years later, he appeared on screen again playing intertextuality examples in literature man with 6 fingers on his right hand — the character had 11 fingers instead of Fans have wondered ever since whether this was a deliberate reference to Spinal Tap or just an accident: deliberate or latent intertextuality?

Most people today have seen Star Warsbut many do not realize that it was intended to be an intertextual work, based on the psychological theories of Joseph Campbell.

Campbell wrote a book called Hero With a Thousand Faceswhich describes a single, universal form of hero-stories that appears in cultures all over the world.

George Lucas, the creator of Star Warswanted to explore this idea of the cross-cultural heroic ideal in the character of Luke Skywalker. The point of a citation is to acknowledge, loud and clear, that the author is borrowing an idea or phrase from someone else.

Citation is about giving credit to the original author. Sometimes the line between latent intertextuality and plagiarism is muddy. For example, imagine a young comedian sees an older comedian on stage at a club. It was just lying buried in his memory all those years until it came out when he was writing a new set of jokes. List of Terms Action. Ad Hominem. Alter Ego. APA Citation. Comic Relief. Deus ex machina. Double Entendre. Dramatic irony. Extended Metaphor. Fairy Tale. Figures of Speech.

Literary Device. Pathetic Fallacy. Plot Twist. Point of View. Red Herring. Rhetorical Device, intertextuality examples in literature. Rhetorical Question.

Science Fiction. Self-Fulfilling Prophecy. Turning Point. Urban Legend. Literary Terms.

 

Intertextuality - Examples and Definition of Intertextuality

 

intertextuality examples in literature

 

Intertextuality in Postmodern Literature. BACK; NEXT ; The poet John Donne once wrote that "no man is an island," and for postmodernists, no text is an island. Postmodernism is all about the connections between texts, including the various ways in which one text references another (or many others). To review, intertextuality is the using of another text to create meaning for another text. Essentially, an author, influenced by a text, uses the text/s to create a new original piece of literature. A famous example of intertextuality in literature is James Joyce’s Ulysses as a retelling of The Odyssey, set in Dublin. Ernest Hemingway used the language of the metaphysical poet John Donne in naming his novel For Whom the Bell Tolls.